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Posts Tagged ‘Turkey leftovers’

Turkey Tetrazzini

A creamy turkey and mushroom pasta bake for the inevitable leftovers. Tetrazzini was created by Italian immigrants to the USA adapting family recipes to local conditions and evolving tradition. We like this.

Wine Suggestion:Ā Given this is American in origin we opened a Californian Chardonnay, the Cline Chardonnay from the Sonoma Coast. The richness of fruit and hints of oak were a great match.

Turkey Tetrazzini – serves 4

  • 200g chestnut mushrooms, sliced
  • 200g spaghetti
  • 50g butter plus a bit extra for frying the mushrooms
  • 2tbsp flour
  • 250ml hot chicken stock
  • a few drops of Tabasco
  • 1 egg yolk
  • 1 tbsp dry sherry
  • 3 tbsp single cream
  • 300g cooked turkey
  • 4 tbsp grated Parmesan

Preheat the oven to 180C.

Start by frying the mushrooms in a little butter until softened and browned. Remove from the heat and set aside.

Cook the spaghetti in a large pan of boiling salted water for the time indicated on the pack.

Meanwhile, make your white sauce. Melt the butter in a saucepan, add the flour and stir and cook for a minutes or so. Gradually whisk in the hot chicken stock until smooth and thickened. Remove from the heat and whisk in the tabasco, egg yolk, sherry and cream, then stir in the cooked turkey and mushrooms.

Layer the cooked spaghetti with the turkey mixture in a ovenproof dish, finishing with a layer of spaghetti and the Parmesan sprinkled over.

Bake in the oven for 25 minutes or until piping hot and bubbling. Put briefly under a hot to crisp up the spaghetti on top if needed.

Serve with a green salad.

(Original recipe by Lulu Grimes in Olive Magazine, January 2008)

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Turkey & parsnip curry

A regular post-Christmas dish in our house. It’s a bit Bridget Jones but really tasty and fairly light and healthy too. Just what you need if you’ve been on the mince pies šŸ˜‰

Wine Suggestion:Ā We love a nice Alsace Pinot Gris with this which is rich enough to stand up to the flavours and also contributes it’s own spices and freshness. We had an older Marcel Deiss Pinot Gris which was found in the cellar and it was deliciously complex, but an easier, younger wine would be good too.

Turkey & Parsnip Curry – serves 4

  • 2tbsp vegetable oil
  • 2 onions, thinly sliced
  • 500g parsnips, peeled and cut into chunks
  • 5 tbsp Madras curry paste (we like Patak’s)
  • 400g tin chopped tomatoes
  • 500g cooked turkey, torn into chunks
  • handful of chopped coriander, to serve
  • 150g natural yoghurt, to serve
  • cooked basmati rice, to serve

Heat the oil in a saucepan, then fry the onions gently for about 10 minutes or until softened and lightly coloured. Stir in the parsnips.

Stir in the curry paste, then add the tin of tomatoes with a little salt. Add 1Ā½ tinfuls of water and bring to the boil, then reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes or until the parsnips are just tender.

Stir in the turkey, then cover the pan and cook for another 5 minutes to heat through.

Serve over steamed basmati rice with some yoghurt on the side and coriander on the top.

(Original recipe fromĀ BBC Good Food Magazine,Ā January 2003.)

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Turkey stock

Not the most glamorous of photos, but stocks are an essential addition to our kitchen andĀ there is lots to be made from the Christmas leftovers. Save the water used to cook the hamĀ as it makes a really good base for minestrone. Ā Salvage all the precious turkey bones to make this delicious stock on Boxing Day. It will keep in the freezer and is great for soups and risottos.

Basic Turkey Stock

  • 2 large onions
  • 2 sticks celery
  • 2 carrots
  • turkey carcass, broken into pieces (add the wings if they haven’t been eaten – no chance in our house!)
  • 6 peppercorns
  • parsley stalks
  • bay leaf

Roughly chop the veg, leave the skins on, then chuck them into your biggest pot. Put the bones on top and add the herbs and peppercorns. Cover with cold water then bring to the boil, skimming off any scum that rises to the top. Once the stock is properly boiling you need to turn it down to a very gentle simmer and keep topping up with more water if any veg or bones get exposed. Skim every now and then. After about 2 hours you should have a clear and tasty stock. Pass through a fine sieve, then portion up and freeze until you need it.

(Original recipe fromĀ BBC Good Food Magazine,Ā January, 2008.)

 

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