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Posts Tagged ‘Turnip’

Carrot and turnip mash

At home in Northern Ireland we call swedes turnips and we’re much more likely to make carrot & parsnip mash. Here in Dublin people serve us mashed carrot and swede which is pretty good too. Serve with meat dishes.

Mashed carrots & swedes – serves 4

  • 300g carrots, chopped small
  • 200g swede, chopped small
  • 25g butter
  • 1 tsp light brown sugar
  • pinch of grated nutmeg

Boil the vegetables in a large pan of boiling salted water for about 20 minutes or until soft. Drain well and return to the pan. Add the butter, sugar and nutmeg and mash together well.

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Parmesan Turnip / Swede

We insist on calling swede turnip in Ireland which can lead to confusion. To be clear we mean the large yellow-fleshed sort as opposed to the smaller, white-fleshed turnips.

We like both versions, but particularly the larger ones, and this is a great side dish which makes a change from mash.

Roasted turnip-swede with Parmesan – to serve 4

  • 1 large swede/turnip, peeled and cut into chips
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 50g Parmesan, grated
  • 1 tbsp rosemary leaves
  • knob of butter
  • 2 garlic cloves, peeled

Heat oven to 220C/fan 200C/gas 7.

Put the turnip, olive oil, almost all of the Parmesan, and the rosemary leaves into a shallow roasting tin. Season, toss well, and arrange in a single layer.

Sprinkle over the remaining Parmesan, dot with butter and add the garlic cloves.

Roast for 35-40 minutes, turning halfway, until golden and cooked through.

(Original recipe from BBC Good Food)

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We love turnips (or swedes as the rest of the world calls them) and think that they deserve a bigger part of the limelight. This puts them centre stage and celebrates their earthiness and sweet character. This recipe comes from Denis Cotter, of Café Paradiso in Cork, and like many of his dishes it is pretty sweet for a savoury dish and has the potential to divide your dinner guests. Our guest is not usually a fan of turnip but she loved this dish.

Swede & Leek Gratin in Maple Cream with Sage & Walnut Crust – serves 4-6

  • 1 large swede
  • 2 leeks, halved lengthways and well washed
  • 30g butter, plus extra for greasing
  • 3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
  • 2 sprigs of fresh thyme
  • 100ml dry white wine
  • 250ml double cream
  • 4 tbsp maple syrup

For the crust: 

  • 8 fresh sage leaves
  • 1 tbsp chopped chives
  • 50g white bread
  • 50g walnuts
  • 30g butter

Preheat the oven to 150ºC/300ºF/gas mark 2.

Bring a large saucepan of water to the boil. Peel and quarter the swede, then chop into slices about 5mm thick. Simmer in the water for 10 minutes, then remove and partly cool them in a bowl of cold water. Drain and set aside.

Chop the leeks into 2cm pieces. Melt the butter in a large pot, over a high heat, add the leeks and garlic and cook, stirring, for 8-10 minutes. Add the thyme and white wine, and boil for 1 minute, then pour in the cream and maple syrup. Bring back to the boil and then take off the heat. Season with salt and pepper.

Grease an oven dish with butter and arrange a layer of swede slices on the bottom. Spoon a third of the leeks on top and cover with another layer of swede. Repeat to get 3 layers of each, finishing with the leeks. Press firmly on the top and put the dish in the oven. Bake for 30 minutes.

To make the crust: put the sage, chives and bread in a food processor and pulse to a fine crumb. Add the walnuts and butter and pulse briefly to chop the walnuts coarsely.

Increase the oven to 180ºC/350ºF/gas mark 4.

Scatter the sage and walnut topping over the gratin and return to the oven for 5 minutes.

Remove from the oven and leave to rest for about 5 minutes before serving.

Wine Suggestion: You’ll have some wine left in the bottle you used for this dish. A dry chenin would be good as it will carry the earthy and sweet characters of this dish but also has enough acidity and texture to cut through the richness.

(Original recipe form Denis Cotter’s For the Love of Food, Harper Collins, 2011.)

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Neeps n Shanks

Real comfort food with rich and deep flavours. We took the meat of the shanks when they were cooked cause our bowls weren’t big enough!

A dish of lamb shanks with preserved lemon and swede – to serve 4

  • 2 large onions, sliced into thick segments
  • 3 tbsp olive oil
  • 4 lamb shanks
  • 2 tbsp plain flour
  • 3 cloves garlic, thinly sliced
  • 750ml light stock or water
  • 200ml white vermouth or white wine
  • a large turnip (or a swede if that’s what you call them), cut into chunks
  • juice of half a lemon
  • 2 preserved lemons
  • 4 bushy sprigs of parsley

Preheat the oven to 160°C/Gas 3.

Warm the oil in a deep casserole and season the lamb. Lighlty brown the lamb all over in the oil, then lift it out.

Add the onions to the pan. Let them soften and colour a little , then stir in the flour.

Add the garlic, stock and wine and bring to the boil. As soon as it boils, add the turnip and the lemon juice along with the spent lemon shell, plus some seasoning.

Put the lamb shanks back in, cover with greaseproof paper and a lid and put in the oven for 2 hours, turning the shanks now and then.

After an 1½ hours cut the preserved lemons in half and scrape out the pith. Chop the skin fairly finely. Add to the casserole and continue to cook for the remaining 30 minutes or until the turnip is tender and you can easily pull the lamb from the bones.

Roughly chop the parsley leaves and add to the casserole. Let it settle for a minute or two before serving.

Wine Suggestion: We would usually pair lamb with red wine but it’s important to think about the sauce when you are matching wine with food. This dish has quite an intense lemon flavour and the sauce is rich which calls more for a full-bodied white such as an oaked Sémillon.

(Original recipe from Nigel Slater’s Tender Volume 1, Fourth Estate, 2009.)

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