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Posts Tagged ‘Fish pie’

Kedgeree Fish Pie

This spicy fish pie makes a nice change from the traditional version. There’s a few processes but it can all be assembled ahead of time and baked when needed.

Wine Suggestion: Open a white with a bit of backbone and depth but not too much acidity; a Chardonnay or similar is our suggestion. Tonight we opened Domaine Rochette’s Beaujolais Blanc, a Chardonnay  from an area more famously known for its reds.

Kedgeree Fish Pie – serves 6

  • 12 quail’s eggs
  • 400g tin light coconut milk
  • 400ml whole milk
  • ½ small pack coriander, leaves chopped, stalks left whole
  • ½ small pack parsley, leaves chopped, stalks left whole
  • 350g skinless smoked haddock fillet, cut into 2-3cm cubes
  • 350g white fish e.g. cod or haddock, cut into 2-3cm cubes
  • 85g butter
  • 1 large onion, finely chopped
  • 85g plain flour
  • zest and juice of 1 lemon
  • 200g fresh or frozen peas

FOR THE MASH

  • 1.4kg floury potatoes, cut into large chunks
  • 2 tsp turmeric
  • 25g butter
  • 2 tbsp mild curry powder
  • 300ml milk

Bring a large pot of water to the boil and add the potatoes and turmeric. Simmer until tender, then drain well and dry over a low heat. Meanwhile, melt the butter for the mash in a small pan. Add the curry powder and cook for a couple of minutes. Stir in the milk and warm through. Mash the potatoes until smooth, then stir in the curried milk. Season well and set aside.

Bring a medium pan of water to the boil. Add the quail’s eggs and boil for 3 minutes, then plunge into a bowl of cold water to cool quickly, then peel carefully.

Mix the coconut milk and whole milk in a frying pan with the coriander stalks and parsley stalks. Heat until just coming to a simmer, then add the fish, cover and cook gently for 5-8 minutes or until just cooked. Remove the fish onto a plate and strain the milk into a jug.

Melt the butter in a large frying pan, add the onion and fry gently until soft. Stir in the flour for 2 minutes, then gradually stir in reserved milk to make a smooth sauce. Bring to the boil and simmer for 5 minutes, stirring continuously until thickened. Turn off the heat and stir in the lemon zest and juice, peas and chopped herbs with some seasoning.

Put the fish and quail’s eggs back into the pan, then tip into an ovenproof dish. Spoon the mash on top. Cover with cling film and chill until ready to cook.

Heat the oven to 200C/180C fan/gas 6 and bake for 30-35 minutes or until golden on top and bubbling underneath.

(Original recipe from BBC Good Food)

Kedgeree Fish Pie topping

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Fish pie with leek mash

No sooner had we given up all hope and planned a hearty fish pie for dinner, than the sun finally came out. The leek mash brightens it up a bit and if served with some green peas it works not too bad for a fine weather dish – just pity the poor cook stuck in the kitchen! We fear you might be horrified when you read the list of ingredients but if the rogue ingredient turns you right off you can always leave it out. It’s also our secret weapon for a prawn cocktail so there’s usually some in our fridge, and it turns out that it tastes surprisingly good in a fish pie too.

Wine Suggestion: this works with a crisp version of Chardonnay; we chose an organic Chablis made by the Gueguen family.

Fish pie with leek mash – serves 6

  • 900g white fish fillets, in large chunks (we used cod)
  • 425ml full-fat milk
  • 100g butter
  • 50g plain flour
  • juice of ½ a small lemon
  • 3 tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1½ tbsp Heinz salad cream (optional)
  • 125ml double cream
  • 3 tbsp finely chopped dill or parsley
  • 200g cooked, peeled prawns
  • 500g leeks, sliced
  • 800g floury potatoes, in chunks

Put the fish and milk into a sauté pan. Bring to a simmer and poach for about 3 minutes. Remove the fish with a slotted spoon and set aside. Reserve the milk.

Melt 50g of the butter in a saucepan, then stir in the flour. Remove the pan from the heat and gradually add the milk, a ladleful at a time, beating with a wooden spoon after each addition. When the milk has all been added, return the pan to the heat and keep stirring as you bring it the boil. It should be very thick. Season, then add the lemon juice, mustard and salad cream. Reduce the heat and cook for 2 minutes. Add the cream and herbs and continue to simmer for another minute. Taste and adjust the seasoning – you want this well-flavoured.

Put the fish and prawns into a 2.4 litre pie dish. Stir any liquid under the fish into the sauce. Pour the sauce over the fish and mix gently, then leave to cool before refrigerating to make it easier to spoon on the mash.

Preheat the oven to 200C/400F/Gas 6.

Melt the remaining 50g of butter in a heavy saucepan and add the leeks. Turn to coat in the butter and season, then add 2 tbsp of water, cover and sweat over a low heat for about 15 minutes or until very soft. Check occasionally and add another spoon of water if needed.

Cook the potatoes in boiling salted water until tender, then drain. Return to the warm pan, cover with a clean tea towel and a lid, then place over a very low heat for a couple of minutes to dry.

Mash the potatoes until smooth, then add the leeks and their juices and season well. Spread the mash over the fish and bake for 30 minutes or until golden and bubbling.

Serve with peas – as with all pies.

(Original recipe from Food from Plenty by Diana Henry, Mitchel Beazley, 2010.)

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Haddock Pie

We are mad about fish pie and this one is particularly good. Yet another excuse to never through away our old food magazines!

Wine Suggestion: you need a fresh, vibrant white with a medium to full body; try to avoid heavily oaked and super-rich wines though. A good choice would be Chenin Blanc and the choice here is getting better each day. We’ve tried well made but simple ones from both the Loire and South Africa to good effect as well as some more complex ones like Adi Badenhorst’s Secateurs from Swartland and some Savennieres too.

Haddock Pie – serves 6

  • 1 small onion, thickly sliced
  • 2 cloves
  • 1 fresh bay leaf
  • 600ml creamy milk
  • 300ml double cream
  • 450g haddock fillet with skin
  • 200g undyed smoked haddock fillet
  • 4 eggs, plus 1 extra egg yolk
  • 100g cooked peeled prawns
  • 100g butter
  • 40g plain flour
  • 5tbsp chopped flatleaf parsley
  • pinch freshly grated nutmeg
  • 1.25kg floury potatoes, such as Maris Pipers, peeled and cut into chunks

Stud a couple of the onion slices with the cloves and put into a large pan with the bay leaf, 450ml of the milk, the cream, haddock and smoked haddock. Bring to the boil and simmer for 8-10 minutes. Lift out the fish and strain the cooking liquor into a jug.

Wait for the fish to cool and meanwhile hard boil the whole eggs for 8 minutes, then drain, cover with cold water and leave to cool.

When the fish has cooled a bit, break it into  large flakes, discarding the skin and any bones. Sprinkle the flakes of fish over the base of a shallow 1.7 litre ovenproof dish. Scatter the prawns over the top. Shell the eggs and cut into chunky slices. Arrange these over the fish and prawns.

Melt 50g of the butter in a saucepan, stir in the flour and cook for a minute. Remove the pan from the heat and gradually add the reserved fish cooking liquor. Return to the heat and slowly bring to the boil, stirring constantly. Lower the heat and simmer gently for 10 minutes.

Take the sauce off the heat, stir in the parsley and season with nutmeg, salt and white pepper. Pour the sauce over the fish and leave to cool.

Preheat the oven to 200C/Gas 6/Fan 180C.

Cook the potatoes in boiling salted water for 12-15 minutes, or until tender. Drain, mash well and beat in the egg yolk and remaining butter. Season with salt and white pepper and beat in enough of the remaining milk to make a smooth mash that’s easy to spread.

Spoon the mashed potato over the filling and mark the surface with a fork. Bake for 40-45 minutes until piping hot and golden brown.

(Original recipe by Rick Stein in BBC Good Food Magazine, June 2001.)

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