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Posts Tagged ‘Figs’

Fig & Gorgonzolha Tartines

September is when you start to find some juicy figs. These easy tartines show them off perfectly.

Wine Suggestion: A young, fruity Pinot Noir often springs to mind when pairing with figs, but bringing in the Gorgonzola made us swing to a white variant of this grape: Pinot Gris. Our choice was from Forrest Estate in Marlborough, New Zealand and it was fresh and full of joyous fruit to match the mood of this dish.

Fig & Gorgonzola Tartines – serves 6

  • 6 thin slices sourdough
  • 2-3 tbsp of truffle or flower honey
  • 1 tsp thyme leaves
  • 6 slices gorgonzola
  • 5 ripe figs, sliced into 4

Toast the sourdough and spread each slice with a little of the honey and sprinkle with some thyme leaves. Lay a slice of gorgonzola on each and squash down a bit with knife so it reaches the edges of the toast.

Put the tartines under a hot grill for a few minutes until the cheese just starts to melt.

Arrange the fig slices on top, sprinkle with a little salt, some black pepper and more thyme, then grill again for a couple of minutes and drizzle with some more honey before serving.

(Original recipe by Lulu Grimes IN: Olive Magazine, September 2013.)

Figs

 

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Almond & Fig cake

We made this when figs were in season and brought it to a friends house for lunch, then forgot about it. Here’s the recipe for the next time you find some fresh figs.

Fig, orange and polenta cake – to serve 8

  • 220g butter
  • 220g golden caster sugar
  • 150g almonds
  • 150g ground almonds
  • 3 large eggs
  • 150g polenta
  • a level teaspoon of baking powder
  • finely grated zest and juice of a large orange
  • 12 green cardamom pods
  • 6 figs

FOR THE SYRUP:

  • the juice of 2 oranges
  • the juice of 2 lemons
  • 4 tbsp honey

Line the base of a loose-bottomed non-stick 20cm cake tin with baking parchment. Preheat the oven to 180°C/Gas 4.

Beat the butter and sugar until light and fluffy. Pour boiling water over the almonds, drain with a spoon and remove the skins. Finely chop the almonds in a food processor or by hand, then add them, along with the ground almonds to the cake mix.

Break the eggs into a small bowl, beat them lightly and add to the mix. Mix the polenta and baking powder together, then fold them into the mixture together with the grated orange zest and juice. Crush the cardamom pods and remove the tiny black seeds, then grind them to a fine powder with a pestle and mortar or spice grinder. Add to the cake mix.

Cut the figs in half. Put half the cake mixture into the lined tin, add the figs, then add the rest of the cake mix and smooth the top level. Bake for 30 minutes, then turn the heat down to 160°C/Gas 3 and bake for a further 25-30 minutes or until the cake feels firm. Insert a metal skewer into the centre of the cake – if it comes out clean the cake is ready.

To make the syrup , squeeze the orange and lemon juice into a stainless steel saucepan, bring to the boil and dissolve the honey in it. Keep at the boil for 4-5 minutes or until a thick syrup has formed.

Poke holes in the top of the cake with a skewer, then spoon over the hot syrup. Leave until almost cool, then remove from the tin. Serve with some thinly sliced oranges and natural yoghurt.

(Original recipe from Nigel Slater’s Tender Volume II, Fourth Estate, London 2010.)

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Delicious served with a drizzle of cold cream.

Roast figs with marsala and muscovado – to serve 4

  • 8 figs
  • sweet marsala (or you can use dry marsala but add an extra tbsp of sugar)
  • light muscovado sugar
  • cream, to serve

Preheat the oven to 200ºC/Gas 6.

Cut the stalks off the figs, then slice a deep cross into the top, going about half way down. Push the fruit around the middle so it opens up like a flower.

Place the figs in a baking dish (or individual pots) and sprinkle over the wine and a couple of tablespoons of sugar.

Bake for 20-25 minutes or until very tender and the edges have started to caramelise. You can finish browning them under the grill if necessary.

Serve with the sticky pan juices and a drizzle of cream.

(Original recipe from Nigel Slater’s Tender: Volume II, Fourth Estate, 2010.)

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Our first recipe from Jerusalem by Yotam Ottolenghi and Sami Tamimi and also the very first recipe in this fabulous new book. We have a short window of opportunity at the moment when fresh figs are going cheap so we’re eating them with almost everything. This makes a great sharing plate.

Roasted sweet potatoes & fresh figs – to serve 4 

  • 4 small sweet potatoes
  • 5 tbsp olive oil
  • 40ml balsamic vinegar (it doesn’t have to be top quality)
  • 20g caster sugar
  • 12 scallions, halved lengthways and cut into 4cm lengths
  • 1 red chilli, thinly sliced
  • 6 ripe fresh figs, quartered
  • 150g soft goat’s cheese

Preheat the oven to 240ºC/220ºC Fan/Gas Mark 9.

Wash the sweet potatoes, halve them lengthways and cut each half into 3 long wedges. Mix with 3 tbsp of the olive oil, 2 tsp of sea salt and some black pepper. Place the wedges on a baking sheet, skin-side down, and bake for about 25 minutes, until soft but not mushy. Remove from the oven and leave to cool.

Make a balsamic reduction by putting the balsamic vinegar and sugar into a small saucepan, bring to the boil, then reduce the heat and simmer for 2-4 minutes or until it thickens. Take the pan off the heat when the vinegar is still “runnier than honey” as it will continue to thicken as it cools. Stir in a drop of water before serving if it becomes too thick to drizzle.

Arrange the sweet potatoes on a large plate. Heat the rest of the oil in a medium saucepan and add the scallions and chilli. Fry on a medium heat for 4-5 minutes, stirring, and then spoon the oil, onions and chilli over the sweet potatoes. Dot the figs among the wedges and then drizzle over the balsamic reduction. Serve at room temperature with the goat’s cheese crumbled over.

(Original recipe from Jerusalem by Yotam Ottolenghi & Sami Tamimi, Ebury Publishing, 2012.)

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