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Posts Tagged ‘honey’

Spelt & Cider Bread

We’ve done this recipe a few times and it works a treat. The texture and flavour balance makes it feel very professional. It keeps well too.

Spelt & Cider Bread  – makes one medium-sized loaf

  • 250g wholemeal spelt flour
  • 250g strong white bread flour
  • 1 heaped tsp sea salt
  • 150ml full-cream milk
  • 1 tsp honey
  • 35g fresh yeast (we used 2 sachets of dried yeast)
  • 250ml dry cider

Warm a large mixing bowl.

Weight the flours into the warmed bowl and stir in the salt.

Warm the milk in a small saucepan until hot, but not boiling (you should be able to test it with your finger). Dissolve the honey in the milk.

Cream the yeast with a teaspoon in a small bowl and slowly pour in the warm milk and honey. When it is smooth, pour onto the flours along with the cider and mix well with your hands. When the dough has formed a rough ball, tip out onto a lightly oiled or floured surface. Knead gently for one minute.

Lightly flour the bowl you mixed the dough in and put the kneaded dough in it. Cover with a clean, warm cloth and leave in a warm, draught-free place for an hour.

Remove the dough and knead gently for a minute. Return to the bowl, cover and return to the warm place for another 25-30 minutes, or until risen again.

Set the oven to 240ºC/Gas 9.

Knead the dough again, this time forming it into a ball, then put it onto a floured baking tray and dust generously with flour. Cover with a cloth and keep warm for another 15-20 minutes.

Bake the dough in the oven for 25 minutes. When it looks brown and crispy, remove it from the oven, turn upside down and tap the bottom. If it is cooked it will sound hollow. Cool on a wire rack.

(Original recipe from Nigel Slater’s The Kitchen Diaries II, Fourth Estate, 2012.)

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Ginger beer & tangerine glazed ham (to serve 8 – we served 6 and had load of leftovers).

If you can get a mild-cured gammon which requires no soaking all the better. If not you will have to start this even earlier as your ham will need to be soaked overnight – ask your butcher’s advice when you’re buying. We used a 3kg mild-cure gammon but if yours is a different size allow 30 mins per 500g, plus an extra 20 mins.

Our advice is to boil the ham the day before and then you only have to do the glaze and bake it before serving.

3kg mild-cure gammon

1 onion, halved

3 tangerines, zest removed (reserve the juice if you want to cook the lentils above!)

4 star anise

2 litres ginger beer

For the glaze: 4 tbsp honey, 2 tbsp wholegrain mustard & a small handful of cloves (we forgot about the cloves and it was delicious anyway).

  • Put the gammon, onion, tangerine zest and star anise in a big pot. Pour over the ginger beer but keep back 100ml (make sure the gammon is just covered – top up with some water if you have to). Bring to the boil, skim the fat off the surface, reduce to a simmer, cover and cook for 3-3 1/2 hours. Remove it from the pan (and keep the liquor if you are going to do the lentil recipe). If you do this in advance you need to cool it and then cover and chill – bring back to room temperature before continuing.
  • Heat the oven to 200C (gas 7). Cut the skin off the gammon but leave a layer of fat. Lightly score the fat into diamond shapes. Put in a roasting tin lined with foil. Warm the honey, mustard and 100ml ginger beer and boil until it thickens. Spoon this over the fat, then stud each diamond with a clove. Bake for 20-25 minutes (or 30 -35 mins if you prepared it ahead).
  • Slice and serve warm or cold and serve with the beetroot, lentil and cauliflower recipes below.

Click here for the original recipe from BBC Good Food.


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We actually make soup almost every week but rarely put them on our blog… not sure why but perhaps we’ll stick them up more often.

Here’s what we’ll be eating for lunch for the rest of the week:

Honeyed Carrot Soup (makes a big pot full)

  • Melt 2 tbsp butter in a big saucepan.
  • Add a big sliced leek and cook for a few minutes until starting to soften.
  • Add 800g of roughly chopped carrots, 2 tsp clear honey, a pinch of chilli flakes and a bay leaf and cook for another couple of minutes.
  • Pour in 2.5 litres of vegetable stock, bring to the boil, and simmer for half an hour.
  • Whizz the soup until smoothish and season.

Find the original recipe here: http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/4852/honeyed-carrot-soup

Julie

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Oh where to start. This was supposed to be a straightforward Tuesday night dinner – blanch a few cabbage leaves, make a bit of stuffing, roll them up and pop them in the oven.

All I can say is that the air was blue in my kitchen (if you don’t use that expression it means I swore a lot).

First I removed the central stalk and blanched the leaves as instructed. Then I made some seasonal stuffing, then I tried to put some stuffing onto a cabbage leaf and roll it into a neat parcel and that’s where it all went wrong. Did the person that wrote this recipe have some sort of gigantic cabbage leaves or something? Or were their cranberries not round and so didn’t ping out the minute you started trying to roll the things? Or did the big split up the middle not cause them a few problems when trying to keep all the stuffing inside? I’ll stop cause I’m getting angry just thinking about it.

Do not be put off by my bad experience – these are divine!!!  A few tips… don’t bother your head taking out the stalk; 6 cabbage leaves is not enough to use up all the stuffing so blanch a few more leaves than this; don’t panic if your stuffed cabbage leaves look like crap they will be fine when they come out of the oven (see pic); and it helps if you stick a cocktail stick through each one to hold it together (good idea Jono).

We had just these for dinner and I cannot do justice to how tasty they were. Chestnuts, wild rice, cranberries, rosemary, balsamic, honey and a few other goodies. The leftovers are going to be used for a side dish tomorrow night.  This is a great recipe and if you follow the advice above hopefully you won’t lose your temper while making. If you do lose your temper I promise you’ll feel better when you taste them.

Find the recipe here:

http://www.bbcgoodfood.com/recipes/8018/braised-stuffed-cabbage

Julie

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